Ann Finnemore, Hypnotherapy, Coaching and Stress Management

I blog about the latest research, items appearing in the news, related books I've read and about how the various tools and techniques I use in therapy and coaching work. I also like to pass on any tips that could help you succeed in making any of those changes you've been thinking of (along with the occasional healthy recipe). I hope at least some of what I write makes you think -- that's always a good way to kick off a change of some sort!

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Can you welcome criticism?

Can you welcome criticism?

How do you handle criticism of your ambitions and plans? Does it upset you or make you feel hurt and defensive?  What about if you actually valued it – how would that feel?

Criticism can be very helpful to us. It can help us realise how much we really want something and it can help us to improve what we are doing.  For criticism to be useful to us in these ways we need first to listen to it objectively.  If a criticism is just from a single person, when others feel that what you’re doing is ok, then it’s probably simply due to a difference in perspective and opinion.  If, however, a particular criticism is coming from a range of different people, it might be that they have a point.  

How is this helpful? Well, if it’s unfair criticism based on someone’s lack of belief in you or as a result of seeing things only from their perspective, you could use it as motivation to do well and to show that your plans can succeed.  If the criticism is widespread, then you can view it as helpful feedback to help you modify your plans and make them more successful.  

It might be hard to take this approach at first, as it’s not easy to listen to criticism when we take it personally.  However, by always asking yourself about how it might be useful to you, you can soon start to use it as something for motivation or as an incentive for continuous improvement.

This is not to say you should have a knee-jerk reaction to criticism, always changing your plans in response to it.  Instead, I’m suggesting that you just listen to it as feedback and then respond in a way that enables you to improve the plans you have – which might be by modifying your plans, or by becoming more determined to do it your way but to communicate that differently, both of which take you closer to success.

I work with clients face-to-face and via Skype, so wherever you are, why not find out more about how I could help you to achieve the happiness success that you deserve? I am also available to talk to groups who want to learn more about stress management, improving lifestyle habits and confidence building. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. today for more information.



Life-in-the-driving-seat-cover “Life in the Driving Seat: taking your road trip to happiness” is available from Amazon in paperback or Kindle versions.

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I love the way lives are transformed when people make changes to the unhelpful and negative behaviours and beliefs that have been getting in their way.  


As a coach, hypnotherapist and nutritional therapist I love the way these three areas can come together to enable people to make the transformational changes they want.  I have seen how people achieve incredible things in their personal and professional lives by taking a real mind-body approach to their physical and mental well-being, fulfilling their full potential physically and in terms of their achievements.

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